AL BUSTAN

January 23, 2010

al-bustan-int1 

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Photo credit: al Bustans

Al Bustan

319 East 53rd Street (Between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)

New York, NY 10022;

212-759-5933

Hours: Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

http://www.albustanny.com/

 

                  ________________________

By Nancy Walman

Popular Lebanese Main Stay Takes Up New Residence in Bigger and Brighter Location

Al Bustan means "The Orchard" in Arabic and for roughly 20 years, the name Al Bustan went hand in hand with authentic Lebanese food and warm Lebanese hospitality to anyone living in or passing through New York City. With a quaint location on 3rd Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets,

Al Bustan became THE place to find the most elegant Lebanese cuisine. While the original closed last December it was due to Owner and Executive Chef Elias Ghafary wanting to expand his brand into an even larger and more beautiful space.

Thankfully for neighbors who have grown accustomed to their presence in the area, Ghafary found a gorgeous two-level space nearby and has reestablished the Al Bustan name back into Manhattan’s culinary landscape.

The clean inviting space is undeniably attractive with its THREE gorgeous fireplaces. With the temperatures continuing to fall and the wind continuing to whirl, perhaps it’s a good time to explore some of the restaurants around town that offer a cozy and warm solution to this nasty winter weather.  One fireplace is in the lounge so diners can quickly warm up as they come in from the cold and the other two are located in  the dining room so you can eat your Lebanese fare fireside at spacious tables, covered with sparkling white cloths,.

Giant wood ceiling beams, brick walls of red, white and stucco and pillars covered in white organdy (lit internally) add to the romantic setting, with its three chandeliers (one massive one leading down to a party room)  and shiny hard wood-floors.

al-bustan-int2

The Elegant Main Dining Room. Photo credit: al Bustans

Aromatic non-alcoholic drinks are a perfect way to start off any meal and will add tranquility to your experience. The Tamarind is a simple concoction of Tamarind syrup and water, while the Jellab is a perfumed drink scented by rose water, incense, carob molasses and floated with pine nuts. The wine list consists mainly of bottles from France, Spain and of course Lebanon, home to the first Middle Eastern winery, Ksara, which was built in 1857 (the red, a Bordeaux blend, is a delight at just $35 the bottle). There is also a full bar offering generous cocktails, poured in lovely glassware.

The stars of any Lebanese restaurant , Meze, wonderful hot and cold appetizers, designed to be shared, including smoky whipped eggplant or chickpeas, divine stuffed grape-leafs,  a choice of three tartars, including lamb with pine nuts and light as air falafel, elevated to new levels, and far from the street food you may have sampled  in lesser kitchens. Four people can order a choice of 18 of these luscious treats, and yummy Lebanese desserts (even the ubiquitous baklava is exceptional) for about $45 a person.

Before ordering, take note of the delicious house-made turnips, coarsely-julienned, marinated  48 hours in in vinegar, salt, garlic and beet juice, which imparts a lovely pink color.

al-bustan-food1

The Mouth watering Meze  Photo Credit Zandy Mangold

Ghafary has been with Al Bustan since the beginning and can actually take credit for introducing New York City to high end Lebanese food a couple of decades ago.  With a pedigree from France and having been #1 in his class at the Culinary School of Beirut, Ghafary is an expert on this bountiful cuisine and loves inviting people in to his “home” every night for some traditional Lebanese food such as Mouhamara, walnut, red pepper, garlic, chili pepper and pomegranate molasses (a personal favorite); Tabbouleh, parsley, tomato, onion and cracked wheat; and Moussakaa, eggplant simmered with tomato, garlic, onion and olive oil, as well as some unique dishes he has brought to this new location including Kibbeh Lakteen bill Saniya, baked pumpkin and cracked wheat stuffed with spinach and chickpea; Zaatar Salad, fresh wild oregano, onion, lemon juice and olive oil; and an updated take: Kibbeh Samak Nayeh, tuna tartare blended with jalapeno and onion.

Other outstanding offerings include classic Lamb Shawarma (paper thin slices of grilled lamb) to grilled Kafta. LabmehFoul Medamas, as well as elegant entrees such as Halibut.

__________________________________________________________________

al-bustan-food2 
Photo Credit Zandy Mangold

While Lebanese cuisine had made successful crossovers to cities including London and Paris, it wasn’t until Ghafary came to the US in 1988 and established himself as a restaurateur that this city finally came to know what true refined Lebanese cuisine meant. Service is not only efficient, but benevolent.

For a welcome change from the more familiar French or Italian cuisine, Al Bustan is a lovely restaurant and in the up-market Lebanese league, as good as it gets.

 

Copyright 2010 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved

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Grand Central Oyster Bar/Restaurant

January 23, 2010

Oyster Bar Interior 3

Grand Central Oyster Bar Grand Central Terminal
89 E. 42nd St.
New York, NY 10017

Phone: (212) 490-6650
Hours of Operation:
Monday – Friday: 11:30am – 9:30pm
Saturday: 12:00pm – 9:30pm
Payment Options:
AMEX, Carte Blanche, Diners Club, Discover, JCB, MasterCard, Visa
Executive Chef: Sandy Ingber
General Manager Jonathan Young

Dress Code: Casual Dress

A New York landmark with Guastivino tiled vaulted ceilings, two dining rooms, an oyster bar and counter seating. The Oyster Bar has 450 seats for you to choose from.
Dining Style: Casual Dining
Cuisine: Seafood
Neighborhood: Midtown East
Cross Street: Vanderbilt and Lexington
Menu: View menu on restaurant’s website & After This Review
Price: $31 to $50
Website: http://www.oysterbarny.com

Make a Reservation On Open Table
_________________________________________________________

New York’s Grand Dame Of Seafood Restaurants

Review By Nancy WalmanOyster Bar Interior 1

 

Award-winning website, Punchin-dot-com, features the Walman Report and reviews of restaurants, travel, wine and theater. The Grand Central Oyster bar recently celebrated its 95th Anniversary. It Serves over 1,300 patrons daily, eating about 1.8 million shellfish a year. 240 gallons of Manhattan and New England clam chowder prepared daily. The restaurant has rented the 27,00 sq. foot space from the MTA since 1913. The Old World interior with its “Guastavino” tile, lining the vaulted ceiling, retains some stained glass windows.

Oyster Bar Interior 2

There’s a formidable wine list & seafood shines. There are always wonderful seasonal specials like herring, bay scallops and the freshest fish anywhere. And oh those oysters: Ask your waiter to recommend a selection of varieties. Wonderful plates of smoked fish will be returning. For now, The vast menu offers an array of creative and traditional great starters and the signature pan roast is still a minor miracle. Look for specials. Chef Sandy Ingber has a deft hand and all cooking techniques, whether grilling, steaming, poaching or frying are executed skillfully. The French fries may be the best in town. Bay Scallops were sweet as sugar and a better Black Cod would be difficult to find.

Service is friendly and accommodating and don’t skip the rich, cold and gooey desserts (fabulous rice pudding) at The Grand Central Oyster Bar/Restaurant, Lexington Ave. & Vanderbilt Place. That’s a Manhattan Must on The Walman Report. For a free subscription to The Walman Report, visit www dot Punchin dot com on the net.

Copyright 2009 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved

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Asian Bistro

January 22, 2010

A TRULY GRAND OPENING!
OPENED OCTOBER 2008 AND ALREADY NAMED IN THE TOP 100
CHINESE RESTAURANTS IN THE USA!

There are over 40,000 Chinese restaurants in the United States, so being in the Top
100 is no easy feat, especially for a restaurant only open since October 2008. The win
gives the restaurant even more reason to celebrate at it’s Grand Opening event on
Thursday, January 29, 2009.
The moment you enter Asian Bistro, at 70 7th Ave, between 14th and 15th Streets, you
start to understand why they have been crowned one of the best in the country. The
sleek, minimal, natural interior gives the impression of a fresh, tradiNonal Asian fusion
restaurant with a modern twist.
The menu offers just that, with over 100 Chinese, Japanese and Thai dishes, from
Chinese tradiNonal dishes like general Tso’s to modern Long Jin Tea Shrimp. There are
Japanese dishes such as the freshest sushi you’ll find in the city and flavor packed Thai
dishes such as the delicious spicy mango, Red Curry. Asian Bistro has something to
please every imaginable taste for Asian cuisine.
High class rules here, with food presentaNon rivaling some of the high-end restaurants
of New York. However, true to it’s name, this bistro style restaurant delivers all this at
an affordable price.
The man behind one of the most successful restaurant openings in New York, owner
Wilson Lee, was born in the Fujian province of China and came to the USA 30 years
ago. A\er living in and running a restaurant in Washington DC, the father of three now
calls Bergen County, NJ home.
Lee was the owner of ‘Fast Wok’, which had been in the same 70 7th Ave locaNon.
Despite the success of this restaurant, Lee recognized the trends and made the brave
decision to give customers what they were asking for, a more upscale restaurant with a
diverse menu. The change has proven a huge success.
On Thursday January 29, 2009, Asian Bistro will host a grand opening event with a lot
to celebrate – a new restaurant, an award and the Chinese New Year. Lee and Asian
Bistro are a shining example and beacon of hope for what storeowners can sNll achieve
In the face of the tough economic Nmes
Please find a@ached with this press release a special invitaIon to the Asian Bistro Grand Opening event. You are
invited to a special lunch or dinner menu tasIng session where you can try the award-winning cuisine and judge
for yourself.
For more informaIon on:
– Asian Bistro, please contact James Maule @ mogul fish at james@mogulfish.com or on 646 335 2079
– The Top 100 Chinese Restaurant Award, please visit www.top100chineserestaurants.com
– For high resoluIon images approved for publicaIon, please download from
www.serengeI.safarisundays.com User: abistro Pass: mfish
Owner Wilson Lee had barely opened the doors at his new Chelsea restaurant when he was asked to fly to Las Vegas
to accept his award on January 5th as one of the Top 100 Chinese Restaurants in the USA in 2008.

AL BUSTAN

January 20, 2010

al-bustan-int1 

interior shots photo credit: al Bustans

Al Bustan

319 East 53rd Street (Between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)

New York, NY 10022;

212-759-5933

Hours: Lunch & Dinnere 7 Days a Week

http://www.albustanny.com/

 

                  Orchids To Al Bustan

By Nancy Walman

Popular Lebanese Main Stay Takes Up New Residence in Bigger and Brighter Location

For roughly 20 years, the name Al Bustan went hand in hand with authentic Lebanese food and warm Lebanese hospitality to anyone living in or passing through New York City. With a quaint location on 3rd Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets,

Al Bustan became THE place to find the most elegant Lebanese cuisine. While the original closed last December it was due to Owner and Executive Chef Elias Ghafary wanting to expand his brand into an even larger and more beautiful space. Thankfully for neighbors who have grown accustomed to their presence in the area, Ghafary found a gorgeous two-level space nearby and has reestablished the Al Bustan name back into Manhattan’s culinary landscape. The restaurant recently softly opened to neighbors and passer bys and has now proudly reopened just in time for 2010.  After serving a limited menu without a liquor license during the holidays, they are now open to the public 7 days a week for lunch and dinner and as luck would have it, the license came in just in time to allow them to officially open the first week of the new year.

The clean inviting space is undeniably attractive with its THREE gorgeous fireplaces. With the temperatures continuing to fall and the wind continuing to whirl, perhaps it’s a good time to explore some of the restaurants around town that offer a cozy and warm solution to this nasty winter weather.  One fireplace is in the lounge so diners can quickly warm up as they come in from the cold and the other two are located in the dining room so you can eat your Lebanese fare fireside (is there any better way? )

Gant wood ceiling beams, brick walls of red, white and stucco, pillars coverd in white organdy, lit internally, three chandaliers, one massive one leading down to a party room.  Shibny hard wood floors, spacxious witgh white clocths,.al-bustan-int2

interior shots photo credit: al Bustans

al-bustan-food1

Photo Credit Zandy Mangold (food shots)

Whippe of aleppo: karabig halab

 

wine Ksara 2006 ($36), Bordeaux blend.

 

Turenips, julienned, marined  48 hours in in vinegar, salt, garlic  & beet juice.

__________________________________________________________________

(RADIO VERSION)

Award-winning website, Punchin-dot-com, features the Walman Report and reviews of restaurants, travel, wine and theater. For roughly 20 years, the name Al Bustan (OWL boo-STAN) went hand in hand with authentic Lebanese food and warm Lebanese hospitality. Now, in its spacious and elegant new location, with its crystal chandeliers and working fireplaces, it is better than ever. And thanks to Owner and Executive Chef Elias (ah-LEE-us), service is some of the most solicitous in town. Although there is a full bar and generous cocktails, try the milk, licorice flavored Arak (R-ack) with the stars of any Lebanese restaurant , Meza (MESS-ah), wonderful hot and cold appetizers, designed to be shared, including smoky whipped eggplant or chickpeas, divine stuffed grape-leafs, lamb tartar with pine nuts light as air falafel (fa-LAH-ful). Four people can order a choice of 18 of these luscious treats, and yummy Lebanese desserts for about $45 person. Try the terrific Lebanese wine, Kssara, for $35 and you’ll agree: In the Lebanese league, Al Bustan, 319 East 53rd Street (Between 2nd & 3rd Avenues) is a s good as it gets. For a free subscription to “The Walman Report,” visit www dot Punchin dot com on the net. (Please Spell Out) That’s p.u.n.c.h.i.n dot com.

al-bustan-food2

Photo Credit Zandy Mangold (food shots)

Ghafary has been with Al Bustan since the beginning and can actually take credit for introducing New York City to high end Lebanese food a couple of decades ago.  With a pedigree from France and having been #1 in his class at the Culinary School of Beirut, Ghafary is an expert on this bountiful cuisine and loves inviting people in to his “home” every night for some traditional Lebanese food such as Mouhamara, walnut, red pepper, garlic, chili pepper and pomegranate molasses; Tabbouleh, parsley, tomato, onion and cracked wheat; and Moussakaa, eggplant simmered with tomato, garlic, onion and olive oil, as well as some unique dishes he has brought to this new location including Kibbeh Lakteen bill Saniya, baked pumpkin and cracked wheat stuffed with spinach and chickpea; Zaatar Salad, fresh wild oregano, onion, lemon juice and olive oil; and Kibbeh Samak Nayeh, tuna tartare blended with jalapeno and onion.

Other outstanding offerings include Labmeh,  Foul Medamas, as well as elegant entrees such as Halibut.

Heralded as the most popular of all the Middle Eastern cuisines, Lebanese fare traditionally consists of fresh vegetables and fruits, poultry, seafood and lamb, the essential flat pita bread that also substitutes as a fork in this culture, and an array of Mediterranean elements such as garlic, lemon, olive oil, cilantro, tomato sauce, among others. This is reflected throughout the menu at Al Bustan in main dishes such as Ghafary’s favorite Samak Tajine, a whole baked fish, usually Red Snapper, topped with a lightly spiced tahini sauce and pine nuts; Kibbeh Lakteen bill Saniyah, baked pumpkin and cracked wheat stuffed with spinach and chickpea; and Habra Nayeh, a lamb filet tartare with spices and garlic paste. Some truly unusual dishes served here include Zaatar Salad, with wild fresh oregano, onion, lemon juice and olive oil; Silek Mahshi, Swiss chard leaves stuffed with rice, tomato, chickpea and lemon; and Chankleesh, spicy cheese, onion and tomato. An assortment of traditional small plates, or Mezze, include Baba Ghannoui, smoked eggplant blended with tahini; Mouhammara, a puree of walnut, red pepper, garlic, cucumber and pomegranate molasses; Tabbouleh, parsley, tomato, onion and cracked wheat; Sujuk, sautéed spicy beef sausages; or Arayess bil Jibneh, toasted pita filled with halloumi cheese.

Aromatic non-alcoholic drinks are a perfect way to start off any meal and will add tranquility to your experience. The Tamarind is a simple concoction of Tamarind syrup and water, while the Jellab is a perfumed drink scented by rose water, incense, carib molasses and floated with pine nuts. The wine list consists mainly of bottles from France, Spain and of course Lebanon, home to the first Middle Eastern winery, Ksara, which was built in 1857.

While Lebanese cuisine had made successful crossovers to cities including London and Paris, it wasn’t until Ghafary came to the US in 1988 and established himself as a restaurateur that this city finally came to know what true refined Lebanese cuisine meant. For this reincarnation Ghafary, the original owner and founder, has carried over some of the original staff such as Chef de Cuisine Refaat Husseini, and has teamed up with new team members including partner, Norman Hobeika, a long stand small business owner who has launched several Lebanese fast food restaurant across the Tri-State area, and part owner Paul Hobeika.

 

Copyright 2010 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved

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Dhaba

January 17, 2010

dhaba-logo

Dhaba Bar 2

Opened: October 2008

 

Location: 108 Lexington Avenue (Btwn 27th Street & 28th Street)

Telephone: (212) 679-1284

Website: www.highwaydhaba.com

Email: Shiva@fineindiandining.com

Cuisine: Indian cuisine

Owner/Executive Chef: Shiva Natarajan

Manager: Roshan Balan

Price Range: Buffet Lunch: $9.95

Lunch & Dinner

Appetizers – $2.00 to $11.00

Entrees – $13.00 to $21.00

Late Night Menu: $10.00 to $15.00

Capacity: 60

Opening Hours: Lunch Monday thru Friday: 11:30 AM to 3:00 PM

Saturday & Sunday: 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Dinner:Monday thru Friday: 3:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Saturday & Sunday: 4:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Dhaba After Hours: Friday & Saturday: 11:00 PM to 2:00 AM

 

*All Major Credit Cards Accepted (Visa, American Express, Discover, MasterCard) *

 

_____________________________________________________

Review By Nancy Walman

Dhaba-inside

 

Traditionally in India, “dhabas” are restaurants that are located on the outskirts of metros in northern India and are widely reputed to serve authentic local food. More recently, “dhabas” are becoming more popular, emerging in cosmopolitan cities like Delhi and Mumbai, bringing their brand of authentic, flavorful food to elite city gourmands. Shiva Natarajan’s newest restaurant endeavor, Dhaba, conveys the same authenticity and delight with every bite. The menu mostly consists of customary specialties of northern India as well as curries with a British influence.

Enclosed in the Curry Hill neighborhood of Lexington Avenue, Dhaba, designed by Thida Thong Thai, is the modern interpretation of a traditional dhaba in India. Low lamps hang discreetly within the restaurant resembling the street lamps covering these traditional Indian eateries. The emblematic earthy greens, natural beiges and dark brown silks combined with magenta and orange accents add a luxurious tone to the dining room. A large communal banquet table in the center keeps with the characteristic dhaba homage. The colorful glass tunnel entrance, decorative spice bottles and steel bar with vibrant colored glass bangles are an unexpected surprise that adds a touch of modern flair while still in tune with its traditional presence.

Menu items include traditional “dhaba” staples such as Sarson ka Saag and Makki da Roti as well as a wide array of Punjabi dishes and Northern Kabobs. Specialty Dishes include Chicken Balchao, a hot curry from Goa with coconut, curry leaves and freshly ground spices, Sarson ka Saag, Curried mustard greens and spinach, Makkai ki Rotii, Home made corn bread, served with the Sarson ka Saag, Lauki Masala, white bottle gourd with lentils and a bay leaf, Methi Mattar Malai, Paneer cheese with green peas, fenugreek, served in a creamy tomato sauce and Shrimp Malaiwala, a delicious spiced shrimp with creamy tomatoes, bay leaf, and fennel.

Dhaba includes a unique list of British influenced curries on their main menu which is rarely offered at Indian restaurants in New York City. A late night menu is also available on Friday and Saturday.

Restaurateur and chef, Shiva Natarajan, is a veteran to the East Coast gourmet industry having opened seven highly regarded restaurants; Chola and Tadka in New York City, Chola, Malabar Hill and Bombay Bar & Grill in Connecticut, Jaipore Royal Indian Cuisine in Brewster New York and Bombay at the Black Swan Inn in Lee, Massachusetts.

Born and raised in Calcuta, Shiva fell in love with the art of cuisine by spending countless hours in the kitchen with his family, developing what would become his life-long passion for food. Following his high school education in Bombay, he left India to pursue his MBA at Pace University in New York City. After spending years traveling throughout India, experiencing many different cuisine styles of his native country, Shiva transported his expertise of Indian cuisine to the restaurant industry of New York City.

For a taste of what authentic Indian cuisine is all about, coupled with the feel of the “new” India, Dhaba will surely delight you.

Dhaba bar

Copyright 2009 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

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GALLAGHER’S STEAK HOUSE

December 29, 2009

Gallaghers interior

Great Steaks, Celebrity Diners, and a Touch of History

228 West 52 Street, New York City, (212) 245-5336
Open seven days a week from noon to midnight.
Reservations suggested. All major credit cards accepted.

http://www.gallaghersnysteakhouse.com/

______________________________________________________

By Nancy WalmanGallaghers AgingRoom

Great Steaks, Celebrity Diners, and a Touch of History. That’s Gallagher’s. The most casual of New York steak houses, with its checkered tablecloths and photos of sports greats on the walls, Gallagher’s has  no pretensions. From the moment you walk through the door, time stands still and customers are pampered and the food improves with each visit.

For starters, there is a first rate shrimp cocktail (or split the smallest lobster, which start at two pounds). You won’t be disappointed with the famous dry-aged steaks (especially the melt-in-your-mouth Sirloin);.The Roast Beef is the best in town. All potato dishes and the fabulous onion rings are recommended.

Vegetables, whether steamed or creamed, are terrific and the wine selection is easily accessed and affordable, with an abundant selection available by the glass.(There is an excellent choice of single malts). You won’t complain about the  Rice Pudding, creamy Cheesecake or wonderful Key Lime Pie Add the easy-going service and you’ll agree that Gallagher’s is a heavy hitter in the steak house league.

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SIDE DISH

Steak, with a Side of Jazz: 

Dinner at Gallagher’s Steak House (228 West 52nd Street) will be "jazzed up" on New Year’s Eve, Thursday night, December 31, when 18-year-old trumpet player RhysTivey is joined by Ross Pederson on the drums, Dan Foose on bass, and Dean Anbar on guitar for a live jazz performance beginning at 9:00 pm through midnight at the famed New York eatery.    For reservations, patrons can contact 212-245-5336 and mention JAZZ to be seated accordingly. A two drink minimum is required for those making reservations who are not dining.

Quick Info: Live Jazz on New Year’s Eve at Gallagher’s Steak House

What: Live Jazz Performances on New Year’s Eve

Where: Gallagher’s Steak House, 228 W. 52nd St., New York

When: Thursday night, December 31, 2009

Time: 9 p.m. – midnight

Who: Jazz quartet ensemble featuring 18-year-old Rhys Tivey, joined by Ross Pederson on the drums, Dan Foose on bass, and Dean Anbar on guitar

Admission: two drink minimum to be seated for those not having dinner.

Reservations: 212-245-5336, mention JAZZ to be seated accordingly

gallagher-Steak

________________________________________________________

Copyright 2009 by Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

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GALLAGHER’S STEAK HOUSE

December 27, 2009

GALLAGHER’S STEAK HOUSEGallaghers interior

Great Steaks, Celebrity Diners, and a Touch of History

228 West 52 Street, New York City, (212) 245-5336
Open seven days a week from noon to midnight.
Reservations suggested. All major credit cards accepted.

http://www.gallaghersnysteakhouse.com/

______________________________________________________

Hours: Continuously from 12 Noon- 12 Midnight
Price Range: Appetizers: $8 – $18. Chilled Medley of Seafood: $115 Entrees: $23-$45. (Lobster, Market Price). Sides: $8-$12.

One Page Wine List: 16 Wines By The Glass: $9 – $15.00. Bottles: $45-$295.
__________________________________________________

By Nancy WalmanGallaghers AgingRoom

The most casual of New York steak houses, with its checkered tablecloths and photos of sports greats on the walls, Gallagher’s has almost no pretensions. Look for the meataging room, visible through the window. You won’t be disappointed with the famous dry-aged steaks (especially the melt-in-your-mouth Sirloin); the Roast Beef is the best in town. Any of the potato dishes (try the hash browns, Gallagher’s or remarkable mashed-to-order) are to die by. You also must sample the fabulous onion rings.

From the moment you walk through the door, time stands still and customers are pampered. Who is a better Senior maître d’hôtel than Sam McBride, whose charm & sense of humor prove that no one beats the Irish, when it comes to the hospitality industry. And under the direction of longtime General Manager Terry Condon, there are always subtle changes in the menu & the food improves with each visit.

For starters, there is a first rate shrimp cocktail (or split the smallest lobster, which start at two pounds and make a wonderful beginning). Vegetables, whether steamed or creamed, are terrific and the wine selection is easily accessed, one page long and in the same folder as the menu. (The excellent choice of single malts must be requested, since it is on the back of the dessert list). It is attractively priced and worth the effort. There are 96 wines listed on the back of the menu: I found many of the selections from Spain not only the best values, but great companions to beef. You won’t complain about the creamy, and I mean creamy rice pudding, the terrific Cheesecake or the wonderful, easy-going service. Gallagher’s is a heavy hitter in the steak house league and rates A Major on the Walman Report.gallagher-Steak

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Background

Gallagher’s New York Steak House, Inc. (“Gallagher’s Steak House”), was established in 1927 by Helen Gallagher and Jack Solomon. It was Broadway’s first steak house and the inventor of the “New York Strip” steak.

Gallagher’s Steak House was designed to be distinct from the formal, plush elegance adapted from Europe that was the restaurant decor style of 1927. Instead, the restaurant employed basic style elements: plain plank floors, wood-paneled walls and red checked tablecloths. The look simultaneously incorporates the feel of a speakeasy.

In 1927, with Prohibition hanging heavily over the land, Gallagher’s was the first speakeasy -a Runyonesque gathering place for gamblers, sports figures, and showbiz folk and other stars of the Broadway firmament., whose photos adorn the walls.

Helen Gallagher knew how to lure celebrities; she was something of one herself. Until the mid-20’s, she had been a Ziegfeld Girl and the wife of a household name, Ed Gallagher, who with Al Shean made up the comedy team of Gallagher and Shean. They were the leading vaudeville and recording duo of their day until the death of Ed Gallagher. Helen then married Jack Solomon, a colourful restaurateur/gambler with a loyal and large following among what was then called the sporting element.

Helen died and Jack Solomon married Irene Hayes. Hayes was the owner of the top floral design shop in the city. Soon after Solomon dies and Irene Hayes is sole owner.

In 1964, Mrs Hayes decided to sell the restaurant; out of hundreds of potential buyers, she selected Jerome Brody. Mr. Brody was a distinguished restaurateur, and the originator of the famed Restaurants Associates who’s accomplishments included the Four Seasons, the Forum of the Twelve Caesars, the Fonda del Sol (designed by Alexander Girard) and many other renowned, successful restaurants in New York City. In 1963 Jerome Brody started the Brody Corp. he restored the Rainbow Room to its former glory, created: L’Etoile (designed by Alexander Girard), Raffles (a private club designed by Cecil Beaton), the ground floor in the new CBS building (designed by Kevin Roche)

Upon buying Gallagher’s in 1964, Jerome Brody had ingenuity and foresight to enclose the meat aging room that was at the front of the restaurant and installed glass windows so that the contents could be seen from the street. Brody stocked it with the best USDA Prime Beef and dry-aged it to 28 days at a constant 36 degrees insure tenderness. This practice is still followed to this day.

Gallagher’s is celebrating its 80th anniversary – 44 of them under the guidance of Jerome Brody, the decor remains exactly the same as it was and so does the extraordinary mix of our clientele- showbiz people from all over the world, sports figures in the boxing, horse, football, baseball, basketball and hockey world, and business professionals.

In 2006 Jerome Brody’s widow Marlene commissioned , Pierre “Peb” Bellocq to paint a mural depicting some of the many celebrity figures that have frequented Gallagher’s over the years. Images depicted include Bill Clinton, Sarah Jessica Parker, Robert De Niro, Joe DiMaggio, Mohammed Ali, John F Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe.

The knowledge and know-how that Jerome Brody brought to Gallagher’s will live forever as a great restaurant landmark in New York City.

Copyright 2009 by Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

Disclosure

A TASTE OF NEW YORK – U.S.D.A. PRIME BEEF FROM GALLAGHER’S STEAK HOUSE – AVAILABLE ON LINE FOR HOLIDAY GIFT MAIL ORDER; CHRISTMAS AND CHANNUKAH DINNER AND GIFT IDEAS
New York, September 16—The holiday season is fast approaching, so don’t forget the meat lover in your life when shopping for gifts on line. Gallagher’s Steak House, the vintage New York steak which is the home of the origina l New York strip steak, now offers its U.S.D.A. prime beef through on line mail order for the holiday season.
The Gallagher’s flagship restaurant is located on West 52nd Street in the heart of Manhattan’ s theater district, now has franchises in Tampa, FL, Newark and Atlantic City, NJ, Las Vegas, NV, and Denver, CO.
To purchase on line log onto www.gallaghersnysteakhouse.com, or call 212 245 5336. Gallagher’s GM Terry Condon and COO of Franchises Philip David have put together the following packages which are available as gifts or for holiday dinner menus for Thanksgiving, Christmas, Channakuh and New Year’s Eve:
The Broadway & 52nd Street: One 14-oz Prime Dry Aged New York Sirloin with one 22-oz Prime USDA Prime Dry Aged Porterhouse Steak, priced at $78; and The West Side, 14-oz USDA Prime Dry Aged “New York Strip” Steaks, bone in, and two 22-oz Prime Dry Aged Porterhouse Steaks, priced at $148
gallaghers dinnermenu20 new

Filed under: American, Excellent, Food, Restaurants, Steak, bar

Disclosure

Award-winning website, Punchin-dot-com, features the Walman Report and reviews of restaurants, travel, wine and theater. Great Steaks, Celebrity Diners, and a Touch of History. That’s Gallagher’s. The most casual of New York steak houses, with its checkered tablecloths and photos of sports greats on the walls, Gallagher’s has almost no pretensions. Look for the meataging room, visible through the window. You won’t be disappointed with the famous dry-aged steaks (especially the melt-in-your-mouth Sirloin); the Roast Beef is the best in town. All potato dishes and the fabulous onion rings. From the moment you walk through the door, time stands still and customers are pampered and the food improves with each visit. For starters, there is a first rate shrimp cocktail (or split the smallest lobster, which start at two pounds). Vegetables, whether steamed or creamed, are terrific and the wine selection is easily accessed and one page long. There is an excellent choice of single malts. You won’t complain about the creamy Rice Pudding, Cheesecake or wonderful Key Lime Pie Add the easy-going service and you’ll agree that Gallagher’s is a heavy hitter in the steak house league. For a free subscription to The Walman Report, visit www dot Punchin dot com on the net. (Please Spell Out) That’s p.u.n.c.h.i.n dot com.

Nino’s 208

December 25, 2009

Nino’s 208

208 E. 58th St.
Dining Style: Casual Elegant
Cuisine: Italian
Neighborhood: Midtown East
Cross Street: Between 2nd and 3rd Avenues
Entree Price: $21 to $34 (Pasta from $16)
Phone: (212) 750-7766
Hours of Operation:
Lunch: Monday – Friday: 11:45am – 4:00pm
Dinner: Monday – Thursday: 5:00pm – 10:30pm, Friday: 5:00pm – 11:00pm, Saturday: 5:00pm – 12:00am, Sunday: 4:00pm – 9:30pm
Payment Options:
AMEX, Discover, MasterCard, Visa
Dress Code: Smart Casual
Accepts Walk-Ins: Yes
Public Transit: N, R, W, 4, 5, & 6 trains to 59th Street/Lexington Avenue.
Parking: No
_________________________________________________________

Review by Nancy Walman

Chef Merlin Tlapa (Centolire) oversees the kitchen at Nino Selimaj’s (Nino’s Tuscany, Osso Bucco) seventh Italian eatery

In the former premises of Ada, the fancified Indian nouvelle restaurant, Nino’s 208 brings the stamp of this excellent restaurant group to East 58th Street at affordable prices. The bi-level design is easy on the eye with its black and white color scheme, which extends to double cloths on the comfortable tables, banquettes and booths. A dramatic winding staircase leads to the second level, which is ideal for private parties.

Service is solicitous and excellent. The host is a seasoned pro, who will guide you through the menu and a vast array of specials. There is an excellent bar and the wine list is well chosen and priced with 16 wines by the glass, starting at just $8 and bottles beginning at $19. The ever dependable Antinori “Santa Cristina” is bargain priced at $24.

In the food department, there is a value oriented $35 prix fixe dinner, including appetizer, main course, dessert and coffee. A la carte is also easy on the pocket and the food fresh, light and carefully prepared. A good beginning is a shared Buffalo Mozzarella, Wrapped In Bresaola with sliced beefsteak tomatoes, roasted yellow sweet beets and arugula pesto. Another option is Sea Bass Carpaccio on potato blini, accompanied by asparagus, horseradish and sour cream.

Pasta is al dente and well sauced: Two unusual selections offer Pappardelle with braised short ribs of beef bolognese and Spaghetti with lamb meatballs, mint pesto, tuscan kale and alio olio. Entree suggestions include Grilled Organic Salmon, braised greens, white beans and garlic confit or Braised Pork Osso Buco, barley risotto, exotic mushrooms, rosemary and lemon zest. We chose a Porterhouse Special for 2, which arrived cut and sizzling as it finished cooking on the platter. The meat was first rate and the grilling superb. Don’t miss the terrific roasted Brussels Sprouts.

All desserts are stylish, including a puckery lemon tart and the best homemade cookies imaginable. Nino’s 208 is waiting to be discovered. Go soon and you can be the lucky winner. That’s A Major on The Walman Report.

Copyright 2009 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

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Tamarind

December 15, 2009
Technorati Tags: ,,

tamarindinterior

41-43 East 22nd Street

New York, NY 10010

Phone: (212) 674-7400

Fax: 212.674.4449

  • Cross Street: Park and Broadway
  • EMail: tamarind@tamarinde22.com
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Website: http://www.tamarinde22.com/
  • Hours of Operation: Lunch: Everyday: 11:30am – 3:00pm
    Dinner: Sunday – Thursday: 5:30pm -11:30pm, Friday – Saturday: 5:30pm – 12:00am
  • AMEX, Carte Blanche, Diners Club, MasterCard, Visa
  • Executive Chef: Raji Jellapalli
  • Dress Code: Casual Dress
  • Opened Jan. 2001
  • Banquet/Private Rooms, Cafe, Entertainment, Full Bar, Patio/Outdoor Dining, Takeout, View, Wine
  • Public Transit: 6, N/R trains to 23rd Street
  • Parking: No
  • Private Party Contact: Gary Walia (212) 674-7400

    tamarindgarymrwalia Owner Avatar Walia and General Manager Gary Walia.

    Tamarind’s team of dedicated chef’s draw on India’s varied regions to take diners on a culinary voyage of the subcontinent. The restaurant’s menu includes dishes from Punjab, Hyderabad, Goa, Madras, Lucknow, and Calcutta. India’s assertive spices and seasonings distinguish its cooking from all others.

    At Tamarind, owner Avatar Walia has created a modern, sophisticated and soothing setting with a colorful mix of classic Indian textiles and artifacts. He named his Flatiron District restaurant after the sweet and sour tamarind, the fruit pod of a tall tropical tree. The pods contain smalls seeds and sweet and sour pulp and are a highly valued ingredient in India’s unique cuisine. 


    tamarind-top_header2

    By Nancy Walman

    Tamarind, a stylish Indian restaurant, and one of Manhattan’s hottest restaurant-tickets, has recently had a complete renovation. The result is subtle and contemporary, with its clean lines, muted color-scheme and glass-enclosed open kitchen.  Tamarind’s food is remarkable All vegetarian dishes are recommended. Superlative appetizers include cauliflower (a special), which was lightly breaded and served with a mildly spicy sweet-sour sauce.There are no adjectives to describe the haunting complexity of the she-crab soup with saffron, ginger juice and sweet spices.

    Tandoori grilled venison chops are marinated in herbs and spices are also wonderful,  as is the tandoori roasted quail. . The classic lamb vindaloo has the mandatory kick, but it isn’t just hot-hot-hot. It’s elegant.For the impossible dream, go for.minced chicken with spinach, yogurt and mint sauce. It is noteworthy for its elegance and delicacy.. Lemon rice, like  is a dream, as are all breads, especially the rosemary nan. Desserts, prove that Indian sweets can be more that one dimensional. Two specials, Indian bread pudding and four versions of the Indian ice cream, Kulfi, proved our point.

    Tamarind offers a broad selection of fine wines from France, Italy, California, and Australia, in addition to Champagne, spirits, Indian beer, liqueurs, brandies, Ports, dessert wines, and cocktails (there are 17 wines by the glass). There is a full service bar at the restaurant’s entrance, that prepares beautifully composed (and presented) cocktails. Service, under the direction of general manager Gary Walia, is the best of any Indian restaurant in New York and owner, Avtar Walia, is as charming as he is dedicated (kissing the regulars and bussing the tables). Tamarind offers a world class dining experience, but alas, the world knows it, so reserve well in advance and be prepared for a full house.

  •  SIDE DISH

    In about a month, Avtar Walia, will open Tamarind TriBeCa, at 99 Hudson Street in an 11,000 square foot space with dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows. There is seating for 175 persons in the two-level restaurant. Located near Nobu, It will be the first luxury Indian restaurant in TriBeCa. 

  • Copyright 2009 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.

    Disclosure

    __________________________________________________

     

  • Tamarind

    December 14, 2009

    Tamarind

    Posted on December 14, 2009 by punchin

    Technorati Tags: Indian,restaurants,New York

    tamarindinterior

    41-43 East 22nd Street

    New York, NY 10010

    Technorati Tags: Indian,Restaurants,Manhattan,New York,Luxury

    Phone: (212) 674-7400

    Fax: 212.674.4449

  • Cross Street: Park and Broadway
  • EMail: tamarind@tamarinde22.com
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Website: http://www.tamarinde22.com/
  • Hours of Operation: Lunch: Everyday: 11:30am – 3:00pm
    Dinner: Sunday – Thursday: 5:30pm -11:30pm, Friday – Saturday: 5:30pm – 12:00am
  • AMEX, Carte Blanche, Diners Club, MasterCard, Visa
  • Executive Chef: Raji Jellapalli
  • Dress Code: Casual Dress
  • Opened Jan. 2001
  • Banquet/Private Rooms, Cafe, Entertainment, Full Bar, Patio/Outdoor Dining, Takeout, View, Wine
  • Public Transit: 6, N/R trains to 23rd Street
  • Parking: No
  • Private Party Contact: Gary Walia (212) 674-7400tamarindgarymrwalia Owner Avatar Walia and General Manager Gary Walia.Tamarind’s team of dedicated chef’s draw on India’s varied regions to take diners on a culinary voyage of the subcontinent. The restaurant’s menu includes dishes from Punjab, Hyderabad, Goa, Madras, Lucknow, and Calcutta. India’s assertive spices and seasonings distinguish its cooking from all others.At Tamarind, owner Avatar Walia has created a modern, sophisticated and soothing setting with a colorful mix of classic Indian textiles and artifacts. He named his Flatiron District restaurant after the sweet and sour tamarind, the fruit pod of a tall tropical tree. The pods contain smalls seeds and sweet and sour pulp and are a highly valued ingredient in India’s unique cuisine. 

    tamarind-top_header2

    By Nancy Walman

    Tamarind, a stylish Indian restaurant, and one of Manhattan’s hottest restaurant-tickets, has recently had a complete renovation. The result is subtle and contemporary, with clean lines, muted color-scheme and glass-enclosed open kitchen.  Tamarind’s food is remarkable. All vegetarian dishes are recommended. Superlative appetizers include cauliflower (a special), which was lightly breaded and served with a mildly spicy sweet-sour sauce.There are no adjectives to describe the haunting complexity of the she-crab soup with saffron, ginger juice and sweet spices.

    Tandoori grilled venison chops are marinated in herbs and spices are also wonderful,  as is the tandoori roasted quail.  The classic lamb vindaloo has the mandatory kick, but it isn’t just hot-hot-hot. It’s elegant.For the impossible dream, go for minced chicken with spinach, yogurt and mint sauce. It is noteworthy for its delicacy. Lemon rice  is a dream, as are all breads, especially the rosemary nan. Desserts  prove that Indian sweets can be more than one dimensional. Two specials, Indian bread pudding and four versions of the Indian ice cream, Kulfi, proved our point.

    Tamarind offers a broad selection of fine wines from France, Italy, California, and Australia, in addition to Champagne, spirits, Indian beer, liqueurs, brandies, Ports, dessert wines, and cocktails (there are 17 wines by the glass). There is a full service bar at the restaurant’s entrance, that prepares beautifully composed (and presented) cocktails.

  • Service, under the direction of general manager Gary Walia, is the best of any Indian restaurant in New York and owner, Avtar Walia, is as charming as he is dedicated (kissing the regulars and busing the tables). Tamarind offers a world class dining experience, but alas, the world knows it, so reserve well in advance and be prepared for a full house.
  • SIDE DISH

    In about a month, Avtar Walia, will open Tamarind TriBeCa, at 99 Hudson Street in an 11,000 square foot space with dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows. There is seating for 175 persons in the two-level restaurant. Located near Nobu, It will be the first luxury Indian restaurant in TriBeCa. Our report will follow.

  • Copyright 2009 By Punch In International. All Rights Reserved.
  • Disclosure